Saturday, October 2, 2010

Savage 2: a tortured soul

old game but its a great game its RTS/FPS/3rd person mmo all wrapped into one

low player base but theres allways a server with 20-30 people on it at all times

id recommend u guys to try it out

Thursday, September 30, 2010


The game darksiders, downloaded it a few days ago its a very good game and i enjoyed playing it, took around 12-14 hours total playtime to finish the entire game

hope they make a second one, it implied they where going to

Sunday, September 26, 2010

Youtube at its finest

go ahead laugh i know u want to
*fixed to embed*

3 biggest lies about food

Myth 1: Eggs are bad for your heart.
The Truth: Eggs do contain a substantial amount of cholesterol in their yolks—about 211 mg per large egg. And yes, cholesterol is the fatty stuff in our blood that contributes to clogged arteries and heart attacks. But labeling eggs as “bad for your heart” is connecting the wrong dots, experts say. “Epidemiologic studies show that most healthy people can eat an egg a day without problems,” says Penny Kris-Etherton, Ph.D., R.D., distinguished professor of nutrition at Penn State University. For most of us the cholesterol we eat doesn’t have a huge impact on raising our blood cholesterol; the body simply compensates by manufacturing less cholesterol itself. Saturated and trans fats have much greater impact on raising blood cholesterol. And a large egg contains only 2 grams of saturated fat and no trans fats. The American Heart Association recommends limiting cholesterol intake to less than 300 mg daily—less than 200 mg if you have a history of heart problems or diabetes or are over 55 (women) or 45 (men). “That works out to less than an egg a day for this population—more like two eggs over the course of the week,” notes Kris-Etherton.

Myth 2: High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) is worse for you than sugar.
The Truth: The idea that high-fructose corn syrup is any more harmful to your health than sugar is “one of those urban myths that sounds right but is basically wrong,” according to the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a health advocacy group. The composition of high-fructose corn syrup is almost identical to table sugar or sucrose (55 percent fructose, 45 percent glucose and 50:50, respectively). Calorie-wise, HFCS is a dead ringer for sucrose. Studies show that HFCS and sucrose have very similar effects on blood levels of insulin, glucose, triglycerides and satiety hormones. In short, it seems to be no worse—but also no better—than sucrose, or table sugar. This controversy, say researchers, is distracting us from the more important issue: we’re eating too much of all sorts of sugars, from HFCS and sucrose to honey and molasses. The American Heart Association recently recommended that women consume no more than 100 calories a day in added sugars [6 teaspoons]; men, 150 calories [9 teaspoons].

Myth 3: Radiation from microwaves creates dangerous compounds in your food.
The Truth: “Radiation” might connote images of nuclear plants, but it simply refers to energy that travels in waves and spreads out as it goes. Microwaves, radio waves and the energy waves that we perceive as visual light all are forms of radiation. So, too, are X-rays and gamma rays—which do pose health concerns. But the microwaves used to cook foods are many, many times weaker than X-rays and gamma rays, says Robert Brackett, Ph.D., director of the National Center for Food Safety and Technology at the Illinois Institute of Technology. And the types of changes that occur in microwaved food as it cooks are “from heat generated inside the food, not the microwaves themselves,” says Brackett. “Microwave cooking is really no different from any other cooking method that applies heat to food.” That said, microwaving in some plastics may leach compounds into your food, so take care to use only microwave-safe containers.

Football player scores both ways on field

It had been a little over four years since the last time anyone else did it, but given the opportunity Saturday at Notre Dame, it only took Stanford fullback/inside linebacker Owen Marecic 13 seconds to score touchdowns on offense and defense to put the Irish away in the fourth quarter:

The last guy to score on offense and defense in the same game, Utah safety Eric Weddle, only took 32 seconds to turn the trick in a win over San Diego State back in 2006. Of course, Doak Walker still thinks all these facemask-wearin' pretty boys are just sissyin' it up out there with their "passing game" and "water breaks," even if Marecic (unlike Weddle and other dabblers on offense, a la Charles Woodson in his 1997 Heisman season) does qualify as a true, old-school iron man by holding down full-time starting jobs on both sides.
His two-way role is one sign of weakness for Stanford: Lack of depth, especially on defense.

Some decent music